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HEP-CCE: Promoting Computational Excellence

HEP-CCE Coordinators: Salman Habib (Argonne), Kerstin Kleese Van Dam (Brookhaven), Rob Roser (Fermilab), and Peter Nugent (Lawrence Berkeley)

The HEP-CCE is a cross-cutting initiative to promote excellence in high performance computing (HPC) including data-intensive applications, scientific simulations, and data movement and storage. Enhancing connections with DOE’s Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program is an important part of the Center’s activities. This includes promoting future-looking R&D initiatives in exascale architectures and systems, intelligent networking, and new data management and data analysis tools. Although the HEP-CCE is not a service-oriented entity, limited resources are available to support collaborative computing efforts for the HEP community, including a common GitHub repository for open source codes, a website for aggregating useful information, and expertise within and without HEP for solving computational problems via the Expert Forum. The HEP-CCE also sponsors topical workshops and student training programs.


ABOUT THE CCE

Find out about our organization, projects, opportunities, and how you can become an HEP-CCE partner.
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AN HEP COLLISION POINT

Scalable IO Workshop at Argonne National Laboratory

The HEP-CCE announces the Scalable IO Workshop at Argonne National Laboratory
23-24 August 2018
High Energy Physics experiments continue to become more data and simulation intensive. There is an expected factor of ten (or more) gap between projected computing needs for HL-LHC experiments and projected growth of current HEP resources. In the US, High Performance Computing resources are going to be growing by more than an order of magnitude by 2021/2022 with the deployment of the US DOE’s first exascale supercomputers. These resources are already becoming an important piece of the HEP computing landscape and will continue to become more important.

One challenge of using leadership computing resources is reading and writing data in scalable ways that does not lead to bottlenecks or performance penalties on the shared filesystems. This Workshop aims to bring together leading IO experts in the HEP field with experts from DOE ASCR Facilities to discuss how to move forward in the next years to make HEP software more friendly to millions of parallel threads accessing files on shared disks.

Knights Landing Hackathon at Brookhaven

On February 26-March 2, 2018, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) hosted a hackathon targeting the Intel Xeon Phi (formerly code-named Knights Landing, or KNL) processors for scientists to come together to optimize their application code performance on the KNL-based supercomputers. Out of the five teams who participated, two teams came from the high energy physics community:

  • APES (Accelerator Particle Energy Simulator): A code for tracking particle-device and particle-particle interactions that has the potential to be used as the design platform for future particle accelerators. Team members all came from BNL.
  • ART: a code for simulating the formation of structures in the universe, particularly galaxy clusters. Team members came from Yale University and University of Miami.

Each team was paired with a mentor with similar scientific background. They also had access to four floating mentors from Intel who brought expertise in OpenMP, Intel hardware architectures, compilers and performance profiling tools. The teams worked with their mentors for five days in a hands-on setting. By the end of the week, all teams achieved significant performance improvements for their codes, with ART and APES achieving >2X and >5X speedup, respectively.

https://www.bnl.gov/newsroom/news.php?a=212743

Machine Learning in Science and Engineering

Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Georgia Tech (GT) will be hosting a
3-day conference on “Machine Learning in Science and Engineering” on
CMU’s campus in Pittsburgh on June 6-8, 2018. The purpose of the
conference is to bring together researchers across the disciplines to
present the latest ideas on the applications of ML methods in their
fields as well as providing a forum for work on the development of new
algorithms designed for challenges in science and engineering. More
information on the conference can be found at the website

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Together with Deirdre Shoemaker from Georgia Tech, I am co-chairing the
Physics Track of the conference. We invite you all to submit abstracts
for 15+5 minute contributed talks through your respective collaborations
that have received information about abstract contributions to our ML
conference.

In case of any questions, please contact manfred.paulini@cern.ch

NERSC KNL Training/Hack-a-thon

Two days of KNL training and optimization sessions being held at NERSC March 6 and 7th.
The training will be presented by Intel experts covering Intel compilers, optimization tools, and libraries and will take place on Tuesday, March 6, 2018.

The following day, there will be a KNL hack-a-thon, with Intel and NERSC experts on hand to help you evaluate the performance of your application and develop an optimization strategy.

The events will be held at LBL’s Shyh Wang Hall (Building 59, CRT) in Room 3101. All sessions will presented online using Zoom but we highly recommend attending in-person if you can.

See https://www.nersc.gov/users/training/events/intel-compilers-tools-and-libraries-training-march-6-2018/ and https://www.nersc.gov/users/training/events/cori-knl-hackathon-march-7-2018/ for details and registration.

Please register for both days if you plan to attend either in person or remotely.

An HEP Collision Point